Eutectic alloys fusible links, for direct handling of heavy loads

These fusible links have a response time near the highest limit requested by standard (whose threshold is 4 minutes), between 3 minutes 30 seconds and 3 minutes 50 seconds, for a temperature rise rate of 20°C/min from 25°C. Their 1.5mm metal thickness and their soldering surface make it possible to withstand directly and without multiplying mechanism the loads encountered in the opening or closing mechanisms of fire doors and shutters.

Raw material

Thickness (mm)

Hole distance (mm)

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Maximum permanent load (DaN)

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Description

 

These fusible links have a response time near the highest limit requested by standard (whose threshold is 4 minutes), between 3 minutes 30 seconds and 3 minutes 50 seconds, for a temperature rise rate of 20°C/min from 25°C. Their 1.5mm metal thickness and their soldering surface make it possible to withstand directly and without multiplying mechanism the loads encountered in the opening or closing mechanisms of fire doors and shutters.

Material: Brass (Copper possible)

Surface Protection: No special surface protection

ROHS compliance: These fusible links are available in two versions

  • Non-ROHS compliant, using traditional alloys containing lead and cadmium, for temperatures 68°C (155°F); 72°C (162°F); 96°C (205°F); 103°C (218°F); 120°C (248°F).
  • ROHS compliant, using ternary alloys based on bismuth, tin and indium, (the high cost of indium makes these models 2 to 3 times more expensive than non-Rohs types) for temperatures 60°C (140°F); 72°C (162°F); 79°C (174°F); 109°C (228°F); 117°C (242°F)

Identification: Model, temperature in °C and date of manufacture are stamped on each fusible link

Tests:

  • Mechanical resistance at ambient temperature: 100% in production
  • Trip temperature under static load: by statistical sampling
  • Trip time in temperature rise under load according to ISO 10294-4: by statistical
  • Holding load 1h at 60°C or 90°C: compliant and verified by statistical sampling in production (Test according to ISO 10294-4)
  • Triggering under minimum load: compliant and verified by statistical sampling in production (Test according to UL33)

Salt spray resistance: According to ISO9227-2012, subjected to a mist formed of 20% by weight of sodium chloride in distilled water, at 35°C for 5 days (120h), the fusible links retain their aptitude for the function, in the response times specified by the standard.

 

Type 5EV 5EY 5ET 5EX
Welding surface (mm²) 450 650 730 1000
Maximum permissible permanent load * (DaN) 45 65 73 100
Minimum triggering load 8N 8N 8N 8N
Mechanical breaking load at 25°C 425 DaN 430 DaN 428 DaN 620 DaN
Response time according to ISO 10294-4 under maximum load ** 3 min. 41 sec. 3 min. 46 sec. 3 min. 42 sec. 3 min. 43 sec.

*Maximum permanent load depends on alloy composition and ambient temperature on 72°C fusible links. Values are given for guidance only, and for a 72°C non ROHS eutectic Alloys with temperatures below 72°C and those that are ROHS compliant, generally have a high proportion of Indium, which greatly reduces the mechanical strength.

** Values measured in our own testing equipment. Testing conditions and equipment comply with ISO10294-4 and ISO DIS 21925-1 2017, fig. C1

Main references

Downloads

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Technical informations associated to this product

  • Historical and technical introduction of fusible alloys and fire safety fusible links

    The earliest known piece made of lead and tin alloy seems to be an Egyptian vase found in Abydos, dated around 1400 BC. During the Roman Empire, lead was used for the construction of water pipes. Melting at 325°C,
  • Historical introduction to temperature measurement

    The temperature measurement was preceded by a long period, throughout the 18th century, when first empirically and then gradually more accurately, have been developed measurement scales, were discovered fixed points for the calibration of these scales, and all physical variations related to temperature change: thermal expansion of gases, liquids, metals and other solids, liquefaction temperatures, boiling temperature, magnetism, thermoelectricity, just to give a few.
  • Temperature sensing principles

    The bimetal strip is formed by two co-laminated metal. One has a high coefficient of expansion, the othera lower or zero. When the strip is heated, it bends proportionally to the temperature. These bimetal blades are generally flat and fixed at one end. But they can be wound in a spiral shape, although this arrangement most often used in the construction of thermometers.